Jonathan   Winkle

Jonathan Winkle

Data Researcher

As a data researcher on Forrester’s marketing data science team, Jonathan focuses on data innovation and consumer behavior. Using Forrester's Technographics® 360 multimethodology approach, Jonathan’s research agenda focuses on uncovering the underlying forces behind consumer behavior and decision making and helping clients understand consumers’ technology, retail, and digital behaviors.

With a background in behavioral science, Jonathan analyzes new streams of data to reveal latent insights and uncover the motivating forces behind consumer choices at various points in the customer life cycle.

Previous Work Experience

Before joining Forrester, Jonathan worked on a variety of research projects that touched on the relationship between visual attention (what we look at) and decision making (what we choose). As a research technician at MIT, he investigated the neural mechanisms of visual cognition in nonhuman primates. In his doctoral studies at Duke, he explored the visual features of choice environments that can bias decision making.

Education

Jonathan earned his Ph.D. from Duke University in cognitive neuroscience, with a focus on decision making and behavioral economics. Prior to that, he graduated from the Rochester Institute of Technology with a B.S. in psychology.

Jonathan Winkle

Data Researcher

As a data researcher on Forrester’s marketing data science team, Jonathan focuses on data innovation and consumer behavior. Using Forrester's Technographics® 360 multimethodology approach, Jonathan’s research agenda focuses on uncovering the underlying forces behind consumer behavior and decision making and helping clients understand consumers’ technology, retail, and digital behaviors.

With a background in behavioral science, Jonathan analyzes new streams of data to reveal latent insights and uncover the motivating forces behind consumer choices at various points in the customer life cycle.

Previous Work Experience

Before joining Forrester, Jonathan worked on a variety of research projects that touched on the relationship between visual attention (what we look at) and decision making (what we choose). As a research technician at MIT, he investigated the neural mechanisms of visual cognition in nonhuman primates. In his doctoral studies at Duke, he explored the visual features of choice environments that can bias decision making.

Education

Jonathan earned his Ph.D. from Duke University in cognitive neuroscience, with a focus on decision making and behavioral economics. Prior to that, he graduated from the Rochester Institute of Technology with a B.S. in psychology.