Mark   Bartrick

Mark Bartrick

Principal Consultant Serving Sourcing & Vendor Management Professionals

As an expert in the software negotiation space, Mark believes that knowing what to ask for, how to ask, and when to ask are critical components of the software sourcing/negotiating process. Mark is adept at dissecting software contracts and vendor proposals in order to identify opportunities for reducing cost and/or improving value. He is also a capable negotiator and can offer on-site or remote advice to clients at any stage of the procurement cycle to help maximize their effectiveness at the negotiating table.

Mark applies his expertise to help businesses negotiate software contracts and pricing, coach IT organizations during software sourcing and contract negotiations, and learn best software negotiation best practices. Mark also supports clients through the software procurement lifecycle (from initial market analysis of potential vendors, through RFI, RFP, shortlisting, and price and terms negotiation, and finally to preferred supplier and contract).

In his career, Mark has helped many businesses negotiate software contracts with leading software suppliers, including: Aquila, BEA, BMC, Business Objects, Chordiant, Coda, Cognos, Computer Associates (CA), Computacenter, Compuware, EMC, Epicor, GeTronics, HP, Hyperion, i2, iSoft, IBM, IFS, Infor, Intentia, Lawson, Legato, Mastek, Manugistics, Microsoft, MidlandHR, NorthgateHR, Oracle, Open Text, PegaSystems, PeopleSoft, Progress, QAD, RightNow Technologies, Sage, salesforce.com, SAP, SAS Institute, Serena, Siebel, SSA Global, Sterling Commerce, Sun Microsystems, Sword Ciboodle, Sybase, Symantec, Syspro, Tibco Software, and Veritas.

Previous Work Experience

Mark Bartrick has been involved in the software industry for more than 25 years. He started off selling for IBM in 1986, then joined Gartner in 1998 to help its clients negotiate software contracts. Mark left Gartner in 2002 and set up his own consultancy in the UK, specializing in helping blue chip businesses negotiate software contracts with the likes of IBM, Oracle, SAP, and Microsoft. Mark joined Forrester in December 2011.

Education

Mark has a degree in business studies from the Birmingham City University.

Mark Bartrick

Principal Consultant Serving Sourcing & Vendor Management Professionals

As an expert in the software negotiation space, Mark believes that knowing what to ask for, how to ask, and when to ask are critical components of the software sourcing/negotiating process. Mark is adept at dissecting software contracts and vendor proposals in order to identify opportunities for reducing cost and/or improving value. He is also a capable negotiator and can offer on-site or remote advice to clients at any stage of the procurement cycle to help maximize their effectiveness at the negotiating table.

Mark applies his expertise to help businesses negotiate software contracts and pricing, coach IT organizations during software sourcing and contract negotiations, and learn best software negotiation best practices. Mark also supports clients through the software procurement lifecycle (from initial market analysis of potential vendors, through RFI, RFP, shortlisting, and price and terms negotiation, and finally to preferred supplier and contract).

In his career, Mark has helped many businesses negotiate software contracts with leading software suppliers, including: Aquila, BEA, BMC, Business Objects, Chordiant, Coda, Cognos, Computer Associates (CA), Computacenter, Compuware, EMC, Epicor, GeTronics, HP, Hyperion, i2, iSoft, IBM, IFS, Infor, Intentia, Lawson, Legato, Mastek, Manugistics, Microsoft, MidlandHR, NorthgateHR, Oracle, Open Text, PegaSystems, PeopleSoft, Progress, QAD, RightNow Technologies, Sage, salesforce.com, SAP, SAS Institute, Serena, Siebel, SSA Global, Sterling Commerce, Sun Microsystems, Sword Ciboodle, Sybase, Symantec, Syspro, Tibco Software, and Veritas.

Previous Work Experience

Mark Bartrick has been involved in the software industry for more than 25 years. He started off selling for IBM in 1986, then joined Gartner in 1998 to help its clients negotiate software contracts. Mark left Gartner in 2002 and set up his own consultancy in the UK, specializing in helping blue chip businesses negotiate software contracts with the likes of IBM, Oracle, SAP, and Microsoft. Mark joined Forrester in December 2011.

Education

Mark has a degree in business studies from the Birmingham City University.

Mark Bartrick's Research

Most RecentMost Popular
  • For Application Development & Delivery Professionals

    REPORT: Preparing For A Salesforce Negotiation

    Plan Ahead To Manage With This Fast-Growing, Strategic SaaS Partner

    February 15, 2017 Liz Herbert, Mark Bartrick

    Salesforce is now a giant in the enterprise software space — with nearly 200,000 customers. The software-as-a-service (SaaS) behemoth now offers a comprehensive suite of solutions for the customer-connected enterprise. As the company's footprint of business process areas grows, many Salesforce deals now exceed $5 million in annual spend. This report highlights key areas of due diligence that application development and delivery (AD&D) pros must address prior to negotiating, discusses pricing models and price drivers, and presents key negotiation strategies. This report is an update to our 2014 report of the same name.

  • For Sourcing & Vendor Management Professionals

    REPORT: Rimini Street Challenges Big Software Maintenance Fees

    The Company Proposes To Reduce Your Oracle And SAP Maintenance Costs By Half, But Is It Right For Your Organization?

    March 20, 2014Mark Bartrick

    The popularity of Oracle and SAP software is clear. All you need to see is their long client list and substantial revenues to know they are giants in the technology marketplace. But their high software maintenance costs regularly invoke inquiry calls at Forrester, as their customers question whether they are genuinely getting value for money — or simply filling Oracle's and SAP's ever deeper pockets. Both vendors generate billions of dollars per year from maintenance, so it's no surprise to see them take legal action when a third party seeks to disrupt the status quo and take some of this highly profitable business away from them. One such third party, Rimini Street, has become a market leader in this space by offering to cut Oracle and SAP maintenance costs by 50%. This document explores whether you should be evaluating the use of Rimini Street and other similar vendors.

  • For Sourcing & Vendor Management Professionals

    REPORT: Oracle Is Buffeted By Headwinds — Are You Prepared?

    New Headwinds For Oracle May Present Negotiation Opportunity For Software Buyers

    October 31, 2013Mark Bartrick

    As Larry Ellison's Oracle sailing team just won the 2013 America's Cup, it seemed timely to revisit the positioning of Oracle — the company — as it faces sea changes in the software environment. For many years, Oracle enjoyed fair-weather sailing, growing quickly to become one of the largest software companies in the world. Oracle software now helps power many of the world's biggest businesses and Oracle enjoys annual revenues of some $37 billion. But the software market has changed in the last few years, and Oracle is starting to face some challenging new headwinds. Disappointing financial results, burgeoning third-party support offerings, the advent of SAP's HANA DB, and a long-delayed Fusion strategy could be the perfect storm that takes the wind out of Oracle's sails. This report examines these changes to see what they might mean for Oracle's customers. We also examine what actions savvy software buyers are taking to adapt to Oracle's changing market position.

  • For Sourcing & Vendor Management Professionals

    REPORT: Navigating The Used Software Market

    Savvy European Software Buyers Can Save Up To 50% By Buying And Selling Used Software

    October 8, 2013Mark Bartrick

    After years of wrangling, on July 3, 2012, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) declared that trading in used software programs was legal in the European Union. This landmark decision reaffirmed that enterprises with excess software license capacity can sell off their unused software assets to resellers who can then offer the used software for sale. Since then, businesses across Europe have taken advantage of this burgeoning market. Not only can enterprises make money by selling unwanted licenses, but they can also save money by buying cheaper used software to fill requirement gaps. It's a double win for software users and a loss for leading software vendors like Microsoft, Oracle, and SAP. This report examines how the market for used software has matured and offers some tips for enterprises considering this as a viable sell or buy option.

  • For Sourcing & Vendor Management Professionals

    REPORT: Software Audits: The Pain, The Shame, And The Gain

    If You Haven't Been Audited Yet, Chances Are You Will Be Soon — So Be Prepared

    August 29, 2013Mark Bartrick

    Forrester sees a growing list of clients that find themselves forced to pay out for noncompliance. It seems that software audits are causing increasing pain as organizations struggle to keep abreast of licensing issues related to technology changes such as virtualization, cloud, bring-your-own-device (BYOD), and the increasing demand for mobile access. There's a simple truth behind the auditing issues we see: If you don't monitor and manage your software estate, audits can become financial embarrassments. This report examines the reasons behind the recent steep ramp in audit activity and some of the steps you can take to stay compliant.

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