Michael   Speyer

Michael Speyer

Principal Consultant - TEI Serving B2B Marketing Professionals

Michael is a senior consultant on Forrester's B2B Marketing team. Using Forrester"s Total Economic Impact™ (TEI) methodology, he develops business cases to assist channel managers in recruiting channel partners and help channel partners make investment decisions. He also develops methodologies for measuring and communicating the value of business technology products and services to enable salespeople to meet the business case justification needs of technology buyers.

Previous Work Experience

Michael was previously Forrester's lead analyst researching IT vendor channel strategies, managed services, and small and medium-size businesses (SMBs). His channels research focused on understanding channel management strategies, evolving channel models, and partner management. He worked with technology marketing and channel professionals to understand SMB buyer behavior and develop SMB go-to-market strategies. His SMB research focused on IT budgets, technology adoption, spending across a broad range of technologies, and segment analysis. His managed services research focused on managed services forecasts and buyer behavior. Michael was also the lead analyst and program manager for Forrester's Business Data Services® program (now Forrsights). This program helps IT vendor executives understand technology spending, adoption, IT buy behavior, and IT organizational structures. Michael grew this program from five to 20 annual global surveys, and oversaw sales growth of 80%

Prior to joining Forrester, Michael worked at Yankee Group. He was director of the SMB technologies practice, which helped IT vendors and service providers understand the spending, behaviors, and preferences of SMBs. He also served as associate director of the network hardware practice, covering both carrier and enterprise network hardware. Michael has also designed and managed IT infrastructures for high-growth companies and worked as a software developer.

Education

Michael holds an MBA from Babson College and B.S.E.E. and M.S.E.E. degrees from the University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa).

Michael Speyer

Principal Consultant - TEI Serving B2B Marketing Professionals

Michael is a senior consultant on Forrester's B2B Marketing team. Using Forrester"s Total Economic Impact™ (TEI) methodology, he develops business cases to assist channel managers in recruiting channel partners and help channel partners make investment decisions. He also develops methodologies for measuring and communicating the value of business technology products and services to enable salespeople to meet the business case justification needs of technology buyers.

Previous Work Experience

Michael was previously Forrester's lead analyst researching IT vendor channel strategies, managed services, and small and medium-size businesses (SMBs). His channels research focused on understanding channel management strategies, evolving channel models, and partner management. He worked with technology marketing and channel professionals to understand SMB buyer behavior and develop SMB go-to-market strategies. His SMB research focused on IT budgets, technology adoption, spending across a broad range of technologies, and segment analysis. His managed services research focused on managed services forecasts and buyer behavior. Michael was also the lead analyst and program manager for Forrester's Business Data Services® program (now Forrsights). This program helps IT vendor executives understand technology spending, adoption, IT buy behavior, and IT organizational structures. Michael grew this program from five to 20 annual global surveys, and oversaw sales growth of 80%

Prior to joining Forrester, Michael worked at Yankee Group. He was director of the SMB technologies practice, which helped IT vendors and service providers understand the spending, behaviors, and preferences of SMBs. He also served as associate director of the network hardware practice, covering both carrier and enterprise network hardware. Michael has also designed and managed IT infrastructures for high-growth companies and worked as a software developer.

Education

Michael holds an MBA from Babson College and B.S.E.E. and M.S.E.E. degrees from the University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa).

Research Coverage

Michael Speyer's Research

Most RecentMost Popular
  • For B2B Marketing Professionals

    REPORT: Introducing Forrester's Vendor Partner Program Benchmark Assessment Tool

    A Tool That Helps Optimize Channel Performance

    August 25, 2008Michael Speyer

    Market dynamics like cloud-delivered computing services, buyer demand for partners with industry and process specialization, and business decision-makers driving technology decisions are forcing channel execs to revamp their partner programs. To prepare their partners and partner programs for future success, channel execs must first benchmark their partner programs' performance, identify performance gaps, and prioritize areas of investment. We developed a partner program performance benchmark tool and surveyed channel execs from leading technology vendors to develop performance benchmarks focusing on budget allocation, program management, partner performance, and priority of future initiatives. We found that over the next 12 months, forward-looking channel execs will focus on profiling partners to better understand their capabilities, improving partners' business skills, and adapting their programs to cater to partners' changing business models.

  • For B2B Marketing Professionals

    REPORT: Forecast: The SMB IT Infrastructure Managed Services Market, 2008 To 2013

    Providers Must Choose Their Target Market Segment Carefully

    July 24, 2008Michael Speyer

    Small and medium-size businesses (SMBs) are comfortable paying a provider to fix their hardware or networks if they break, but the idea of contracting for IT infrastructure support before there's trouble is a foreign concept. The SMB IT infrastructure managed services market has been hyped by vendors as the next big opportunity and has attracted providers from many quarters, including hardware vendors, value-added resellers, distributors, and telcos. Forrester projects that this market will reach $4.3 billion in the US by 2013, with most of the opportunity skewed to smaller firms of 20 to 99 employees.

  • For B2B Marketing Professionals

    REPORT: IBM's Server Appliance Will Change The Market For Small Business Computing

    Lotus Foundations Server Adds Credibility To The Product Category

    May 8, 2008Michael Speyer

    Small businesses want sophisticated IT functionality, but their lack of IT resources requires that IT is delivered in a highly reliable no-touch manner. Linux-based server appliances have emerged to satisfy these requirements, but IBM's recent announcement of its Lotus Foundations Start server family adds a new level of credibility to the "office in a box" concept. Linux-based small business server appliances open up new opportunities for server vendors and independent software vendors (ISVs), but they will face significant competition from cloud-based alternatives.

  • For B2B Marketing Professionals

    REPORT: A Managed Services Taxonomy

    How Tech Marketers Can Differentiate Managed Services Messaging And Understand Their Competition

    April 22, 2008Michael Speyer

    The phrase "managed services" is used so broadly in vendors' marketing literature that it has become difficult for buyers to distinguish these services from other kinds of outsourcing or understand their value proposition. To help tech marketers focus their messaging, Forrester characterizes managed services as having a one-to-many, standardized service delivery model with a relatively small labor component and offers examples of how to articulate the value of these offerings. We break the segments down into network, voice, IT infrastructure, security, and application management, providing a quick list of key competitors in each subsegment.

  • For B2B Marketing Professionals

    REPORT: Helping Your VARs And SIs To Do Marketing

    How To Improve The Marketing Awareness And Effectiveness Of Your Channel

    April 11, 2008Michael Speyer

    Lead generation for tech vendors is an expensive, inefficient process. Tech marketers who want their value-added reseller (VAR) and systems integrator (SI) partners to shoulder some of this burden will find that these partners rarely understand the value of marketing, are reluctant to invest in marketing programs, and generally require a lot of handholding when performing marketing activities. To boost partner marketing effectiveness in the short term, tech marketers should work with partners that have a record of generating their own leads or have full-time marketing staff. Tech vendors should insist on defensible marketing plans with clearly stated goals and formal lead tracking and nurturing processes. To increase the pool of partners that can do marketing in the long term, tech vendors should invest in partner education and build marketing incentives into their channel programs.

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