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US Mobile Banking Forecast, 2010 To 2015

Robust Growth To Drive Demand For Stronger Mobile Functionality

January 31, 2011

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Why Read This Report

US mobile banking adoption has experienced rapid growth in the past three years, more than doubling from 5% of online adults in 2007 to 12% in Q2 2010. By 2015, Forrester predicts that one in five US adults will be using mobile banking. Consumer adoption of smartphones and increasing use of the mobile Web will drive sustained growth of casual, informational use of mobile banking — to check balances, review transactions, or receive alerts. Creating preference for mobile banking broadly will require banks to deliver more obvious value and superior execution than other channels offer. Functionality like mobile remote deposit capture and contactless mobile payments alone, though, will not anchor mobile banking the way that bill payment and account transfers have done for online banking. Channel managers must address issues of duplicate functionality, marginal user experiences, and a general failure to exploit the most valuable aspects of the channel if mobile banking is to become a critical part of how consumers manage their accounts.

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Also in Collection: Mobile Banking

Table of Contents

  • Mobile Banking Adoption To Soar, Carried Aloft By Channel Trends
  • Current Growth Not Sustainable Without New Targets, New Features
  • WHAT IT MEANS

  • Functionality, Not Phones, Will Drive Next Wave Of Mobile Banking Growth
  • Supplemental Material
  • Related Research Documents

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