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For B2B Marketing Professionals

"Owner" And "Sponsor" B2B Community Success Metrics

The Right Way For Tech Marketers To Measure Effectiveness

November 7, 2012

Authors

  • By Zachary Reiss-Davis,
  • Kim Celestre
  • with Bradford J. Holmes,
  • Melissa Parrish,
  • Sophia I. Vargas

Why Read This Report

As a B2B social marketer in charge of either owner or sponsor strategy communities, meaning communities that you operate — and fund — on your domain, you need to be able to set expectations for success and use benchmarks to set those goals and measure progress. However, the metrics most marketers use for that purpose are the wrong ones. Rather than focusing on a target membership number or the length of time it takes to reach critical mass, you should be focused on basic cross-industry performance averages such as the percentage of website users that visit the community and the percentage of those visitors that become members.

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Table of Contents

  • B2B Community Marketers Ask The Wrong Benchmark Questions
  • Consistent Performance Averages Apply Across Communities
  • Money And Management Yield Greater Than Average Results
  • Gauge Your Expected Level Of Success
  • RECOMMENDATIONS

  • Don't Let Measurement Myths Paralyze You
  • Supplemental Material
  • Related Research Documents